#SAEM16 panels

SAEM's Annual Meeting is in New Orleans this year. While a lot has changed since San Diego, I'm fortunate to again be participating in several didactic sessions this week. The program is available online - links to slides are forthcoming. 
  • Tuesday @ 1:45pm or so in Napoleon Ballroom C2 (3rd floor): As part of the Social Media Bootcamp, I'll be talking with Megan Ranney about using Social Media for research - slides

  • Thursday @ 8am in Napoleon Ballroom B2 (3rd floor): DS-22: I'll speak about conducting EM research using social media tools, in a panel with Megan Ranney & Austin Kilaru - slides & references

  • Thursday @ 9am in Napoleon Ballroom B2 (3rd floor): DS-28: Nidhi Garg moderates a panel featuring me, Esther Choo and Megan Ranney on disseminating research through Social Media - slides & references
If you're interested in any of these topics, and at SAEM, you probably also want to attend the Social Media committee meeting Wednesday at 1pm in Evergreen (4th floor). Also on Friday morning Ken Milne talks about knowledge translation through social media, in DS-58 (Grand Ballroom E, 5th floor).  In the same room, right after, Rob Cooney and others talk about social media as an adjunct to resident conference (DS-62).

So, four social media-related didactic sessions, plus a bootcamp. Meanwhile, I can't help but notice the typical informatics panels (some of which I'd participated in, last year) aren't present this year. I don't even see an Informatics Interest Group meeting. Not sure if anything can be read into this shift, but at the very least there's an opportunity to reintroduce an important topic to SAEM, next year. 

mHealth Toolbox at #ICEM16: Cape Town, April 16&17

I'm honored to be participating in the mHealth Toolbox next month. The two-day event is taking shape with a terrific lineup of physicians, entrepreneurs, technology enthusiasts, and many, many gadgets. Check back for links to presentations and resources.

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Another bit about software - iOS mail clients.

Federico tweeted that iOS mail clients are today what Twitter clients were a few years back. Sure, but I never cared so much about reading and writing tweets because my job(s) didn't depend on it. E-mail is mission critical.

I loved Mailbox but it never did Outlook. Acompli was a leap forward, flawlessly blending Outlook and Gmail; I even liked its built-in calendar and recent files feature. I thought it was good that Microsoft bought it - but then innovation stalled and they removed the one feature I was really enamored with - programmable long swipes. Yeah, this may have been a power user feature that confused newbies, but this power user was waiting for someone to re-implement this helpful feature.

Then came Airmail, the most customizable iOS mail client yet. Sure, the new app has a few rough edges, but I'm happy to struggle through a few rough edges, because it has long swipes! And, easy integration with organizational apps like Todoist (you can swipe to Todoist, which almost makes me look forward to emails).

The Big To-Do

So, I've become one of those people that blogs about organizational software. I'm sorry. Just writing this post will probably squander every extra minute I'd have ever saved by using such software. 

For years I've been using OmniFocus, and it's been pretty good. Before that I was using Apple's own Reminders solution (I was a big fan of the Siri integration, which Omnifocus also takes advantage of). Before Reminders, I used Remember the Milk and Wunderlist. 

I've been on Todoist for a few weeks, and it's pretty great.